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KEY CONSERVATION | EMPOWERING HOPE

© 2019 KEY CONSERVATION 

Key Conservation Pilot Project | Turtle Survival Alliance

July 22, 2019

We are excited to announce our new interview series called KEYS, where we will be taking you into the field to meet the Key Conservation Pilot Projects! Our Pilot Projects are conservation organizations from all over the world who have joined us to help test the app in the field while it is in development. Each Pilot Project has an important role in giving their feedback on what they like about the app and what changes would help us make the app better. Their feedback helps us to make sure everything is working properly before we move onto the next stage of development. 

Over the next few months, we will share the important work these conservation organizations are doing and how they are vital to Key's development through these exclusive interviews so be sure to stay tuned! 

ORGANIZATION

 

 Turtle Survival Alliance

 

 

Where are you based?

 

 

We are based in Charleston, South Carolina

TELL US ABOUT YOUR organization AND THE WORK THAT YOU DO.

 

 

The Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) was formed in 2001 as "an IUCN partnership for sustainable captive management of freshwater turtles and tortoises." The TSA arose in response to the rampant and unsustainable harvest of Asian turtle populations to supply Chinese markets, a situation known as the Asian Turtle Crisis. Recognizing that some species of turtles and tortoises were unlikely to survive without well-managed populations, the TSA was charged with developing breeding programs for the most critically endangered of the world's chelonian species.

 

For seven years, the TSA functioned within the IUCN (World Conservation Union) structure, recognized as a task force of the Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group (TFTSG). With branches in Europe and the U.S., the TSA organized a diverse partnership involving zoos and aquariums, universities, private breeders and serious hobbyists, veterinarians, conservation NGOs, range country turtle facilities and turtle rescue organizations. That diversity is one of the TSA's core strengths and has allowed the development of a global network of linked breeding programs, known as Assurance Colonies. The TSA has attained recognition for its ability to build partnerships with government regulatory authorities and to help move otherwise doomed, illegally traded, and confiscated turtles and tortoises into programs designed to prevent their extinction. Assurance Colonies are organized both in situ (in the range country) or ex situ (outside the range country) and are crucial to preventing the extinction of many species, some of which have already been lost in nature. Since forming, the TSA has become recognized as a global force for turtle conservation, capable of taking swift and decisive action on behalf of critically endangered chelonians. Although the TSA was organized in response to the Asian Turtle Crisis, the group is well positioned to respond to other endangered turtle species, particularly where a managed breeding component is included in their overall survival strategy.

 

Today the TSA supports projects or programs – both wild and captive - that benefit 21 of the World’s 25 Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles. In 2005, the TSA sought nonprofit status and created the TSA Foundation, a 501(c)(3) registered in the State of Texas and with an office at the Fort Worth Zoo to provide administrative support. In 2017, the administrative offices were moved to Charleston, South Carolina. Because of the success of its conservation programs around the world, the TSA found itself in need of full-time staff in order to maintain our current rate of growth and meet the urgent conservation issues facing turtles and tortoises. The TSA also sought to be better positioned financially and gain greater visibility within the international donor community. To facilitate a fresh approach the decision was made in 2008 to adopt a more corporate structure with a formal Board of Directors. In 2013, the TSA centralized its base of operations in Cross, South Carolina by opening the Turtle Survival Center (TSC). In just three years, the TSC became recognized as a world-class turtle conservation center, complete with a greenhouse, veterinary clinic, quarantine facility, and multiple indoor/outdoor enclosures. This center is the TSA’s first and only U.S.-based conservation center, and is home to a growing collection of more than 700 turtles and tortoises, representing 32 of the world’s critically endangered species, and cared for by a staff of five full time employees. The collection at the TSC is a result of a careful and in depth review of every turtle and tortoise species, drawing on the expertise of a core TSA group of conservation biologists both in the US and abroad.

 

 

Today, the TSA is an action-oriented global partnership, focusing on species that are at high risk of extinction, and working in turtle diversity hotspots around the world. Widely recognized as a global catalyst for turtle conservation based on its reputation for swift and decisive action, the TSA has made a bold commitment to zero turtle extinctions in the 21st century. With projects or programs in Belize, Colombia, Europe, Madagascar, and throughout Asia, the TSA is a recognized force for turtle conservation globally. TSA’s conservation actions utilize a three-pronged approach: 1) Restoring populations in the wild where possible, 2) Securing species in captivity through assurance colonies, and 3) Building the capacity to restore, secure and conserve species within their range country.

 

WHAT SPECIES DO YOU WORK WITH AND WHAT HABITATS DO YOU WORK IN?

 

 The TSA works with over 118 different species of terrestrial turtles in international, non-marine habitats.

 

 

 

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES THAT YOU FACE AS AN ORGANIZATION?

 

As turtle populations continue to decline we must constantly be expanding the breadth of our conservation efforts. This, in turn, creates a greater need for financial support and resources.

 

 

 

 

 

WHEN YOU encounter HARD DAYS WHAT MOTIVATES YOU TO KEEP GOING?

 

 

Our innate love for turtles and the recognition that conservation efforts around the world on their behalf rely on us.

 

 

WHAT IS ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE STORIES FROM THE FIELD?

 

 

Dr. Shailendra Singh, Director of Turtle Survival Alliance India comments: Early in my career during a field sampling trip at dusk, my assistant and I were deploying hoop-traps to sample for turtles in a marshy area in the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve along the India-Nepal border. We had walked about 50 meters into the wetland, were half-immersed in viscous mud and were trying to reach the interior puddles, when suddenly we heard a growl from an approaching tiger! Another assistant who was standing at the edge of the swampy area, and who was given the responsibility of shining the flash-light while we were setting up the trap, ran away as soon as he heard the tiger growl. This left us in the dark, completely frozen, and alone. I whispered to my assistant to keep quiet and motionless, as he was trying unsuccessfully to attempt to get out of the mud possibly to also “run” back. Later we found out that one of our senior colleagues was the culprit, having mocked a growling tiger to test our nerves in the chilly darkness! The field assistant who ran away resigned the next morning.

 

 

WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO BE A KEY CONSERVATION PILOT PROJECT?

 

 

We liked the idea of helping other conservation projects and building bridges in the international community.

 

 

 

 

WHAT KEY APP FEATURE ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO USING?

 

 

 

The real time fundraising feature was very attractive to us because of the amount of confiscations we are involved in due to the illegal wildlife trade.

 

 

PLEASE SHARE WHERE WE CAN FIND YOU ON SOCIAL MEDIA

 

 

The links for our social medias are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALL PHOTOS PROVIDED BY:

Turtle survival alliance

 

 

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